Yom Hashoah, Yom Hazikaron and Yom Ha’atzmaut

Holocaust Remembrance Day

 

During the months of April and May this year, three very important days are commemorated by Jews both in Israel and throughout the world. The three days are ‘Yom Ha'shoah’, ‘Yom Hazikaron’, and ‘Yom Ha’atzmaut’.

Each of these days is very significant for Jewish people throughout the world. One specific day, however, has worldwide significance – that day is ‘Yom Ha’atzmaut’.

Lag B’Omer

 

Leviticus 23:15-16: “And you shall count for yourselves from the day after the Sabbath, from the day that you brought the sheaf of the wave offering: seven Sabbaths shall be completed. Count fifty days to the day after the seventh Sabbath; then you shall offer a new grain offering to the LORD.”

On the 19th May 2022, Jews all over the world will celebrate ‘Lag B’Omer’. ‘Lag B’Omer’ is Hebrew shorthand for the 33rd day of the ‘Omer’. ‘Lag’, or L"G is the Hebrew numerals for 33. It falls on the 33rd day of the counting of the ‘Omer’ (the amount of days as counted from the second day of ‘Pesach (Passover) until the holiday of ‘Shavuot’.) This corresponds to the 18th day of the Hebrew month of ‘Iyar’.

Shavuot

On the evening of the 4th June, corresponding to the 5th day of the Hebrew month of Sivan, Jewish people all over the world will begin celebrating the festival of ‘Shavuot’.

‘Shavuot’, the Feast of the Weeks, is the Jewish holiday celebrating the harvest season in Israel. ‘Shavuot’, which means ‘weeks’, refers to the timing of the festival which is held exactly 7 weeks after Passover.

Tisha B'Av

At sunset on the 17th July 2021, Jews all over the world begin the annual 24 hour fast of ‘Tisha B’Av’ (the ninth day of the Hebrew month of ‘Av’) which this year is on the 18th July 2021.

The fast commemorates the destruction of the First and Second temples in Jerusalem which occurred about 656 years apart, but on the same date. Accordingly, ‘Tisha B’Av’ has been called the "saddest day in Jewish history".

Rosh Hashanah

At sunset on the 6th September 2021, corresponding to the last day of the Hebrew month of ‘Elul’, Jewish people all over the world will begin celebrating ‘Rosh Hashanah’, the Jewish New Year which falls on the first day of the Hebrew month of ‘Tishrei’.

‘Rosh Hashanah’ literally means ‘head of the year’; it is observed on the first day of ‘Tishrei’ as ordained in the ‘Torah’, in Leviticus 23:24: ”Speak to the children of Israel, saying: ’In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall have a Sabbath-rest, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation’”.

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